GP Tens I

In one branch of dimensional world history, there was no assassination attempt on Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and as a result, things just settled down in Europe and racing flourished during the second decade of the 20th century. GP Tens, a formula libre brought together the best automotive and aeronautical engineers of the day for insane competition where innovation was the key to winning.

1) GP Tens La Victoire Totale
La Victoire Totale "Lupin". Shakedown, Pendine Sands, Carmarthen, 1917. Archie Leabo, pilot.

2) 1915 Brickhouse Special

William F. Brickhouse, founder of Brickhouse Mining and Medical had the 17 liter V6 built for the 1915 GP Tens Cup race in Pennsylvania. Brickhouse managed third place at the Uniontown board track. In 1916, William's brother, Franklin L. Brickhouse had the car shipped to England where he intended to run at Brooklands, but the steamship rolled over in a storm and sank to the bottom of the North Atlantic. The floatation shipping crate that Franklin had designed as insurance for such an event broke loose as designed, but the crew had survival on their minds, not keeping tabs on the loose cargo. The car was never seen again. The Brickhouse brothers moved on and had success with the 1917 Brickhouse Speedliner, nearly winning the GP Tens Cup that year.

3) Jesperson Superflivver

Trouser magnate Samuel T.Y. Jesperson entered the 1917 GP Tens Cup with a unique chassis built around a Brickhouse parallel straight bank 8. A crowd favorite at Jesperson's home track debut in Dayton, Ohio, the "Superflivver" failed to deliver the goods, dropping two laps to the leader in the first ten. Throughout the season, Team Jesperson managed to chase out some chassis issues that plagued the handling performance, and coaxed an additional 7 bhp out of the 18 liter engine and had a solid points finish by the end of the season, despite not winning a single podium. The car was put in storage immediately at the close of the season in anticipation of running in 1918, but Jesperson contracted typhoid while on vacation in French-Indochina that winter. The car was unearthed from the coach house of the Jesperson estate in 1952 by the great-nephew of S. Jesperson and is in preserved, but unrestored condition, permanently displayed at the GP Tens Museum in Waukesha, Wisconsin.

GP Tens I

GP Tens I